medicine

World Day of Social Justice

“Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.” -United Nations, WDSJ webpage (1)

In 2007, the United Nations General Assembly declared that February 20th be celebrated annually as World Day of Social Justice. A product of rising globalization, World Day of Social Justice encourages nations to devote the day towards the eradication of poverty, inequity, exclusion, and unemployment. While we know these goals cannot be achieved in a day, World Day of Social Justice provides us with a chance to look around our community, locally and globally, with extra purpose and passion. GlobeMed at Tufts and PHASE Nepal share a drive to collaborate and eliminate global health inequity, and we find inspiration in the action taken by the international community in support of global health equity. February 20th has become a day to rally, to dream, to energize, to learn, to grow, and to come together. Especially in the current national climate, it is increasingly important every single day to take action and to create hope.

This February 23rd, GlobeMed at Tufts will be hosting a film screening of Vessel, an award-winning documentary following the work of Rebecca Gomperts, founder of Women on Waves. Dr. Gomperts, a Dutch physician, activist, and artist, made it her life’s work to end the health risks associated with illegal abortions. Dr. Gomperts and her organization work on a ship-turned-clinic that sails to areas where women cannot access legal and safe abortion. Once in international waters, Dr. Gomperts and her crew are trained and authorized to administer abortions and provide contraceptives. They also train local women to administer safe abortions using non-surgical WHO-researched protocols. Through a network of empowerment, Women on Waves has given countless women access to safe abortions, birth control, and invaluable knowledge.

We find this documentary especially relevant after the reenactment of the U.S. Mexico City Policy, also known as the Global Gag. First enacted by President Reagan and most recently reenacted by President Trump, this policy blocks federal funding to NGOs that provide abortion services or counseling as well as those that advocate for the decriminalization or expansion of abortion services.

GlobeMed at Tufts is devoted to social justice, nationally and abroad, and aims to emphasize the importance of self-education and community discussion. Please join us on February 23rd at 6 PM in Tisch 304 for a free screening of Vessel with snacks, discussion, and good company! We hope to foster an open dialogue about the film and World Day of Social Justice, so all thoughts, feelings, and opinions are welcome.

Vessel trailer: https://vimeo.com/106489346

Women on Waves website: http://www.womenonwaves.org/


(1) http://www.un.org/en/events/socialjusticeday/

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Right-To-Try

In 2013, a blockbuster movie came out, detailing the true story of how one man tested positive for HIV, was given thirty days to live, and proceeded to defy everyone’s expectations. The main character began exploring alternative options for treating HIV, which brought him to Mexico. There, he discovered medicine that was not approved in the United States, and was soon treating hundreds of people in his hometown. Dallas Buyers Club is pop culture’s interpretation of a very real debate in the world of health and healthcare today. When is too soon to try experimental drugs? If someone’s life could be saved, is it morally justifiable to withhold unapproved medications?

This year, five states– Colorado, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Arizona– have passed so-called “right-to-try” laws that expand access to experimental medications for patients in dire conditions. These laws have legally accomplished what Ron Woodroof attempted to establish in Dallas Buyers Club, and like in that story, lives could be improved or saved– but still, does that make it right?

Critics of these laws point out the very legitimate reasons why these drugs aren’t yet on the market: there could be undiscovered risks that would cause even more harm than any good the drug would do. The FDA exists for a reason, and allowing the right-to-try compromises the safety of the patient.

However, many terminally ill patients don’t have the time to wait for a request to the FDA to be processed, and the right-to-try is their opportunity to have a chance to live, or even just live a little better for a little longer. What do you think? Do we have a right-to-try?

For more information, check out this article.

Kellie Chin is a freshman and has yet to declare her major. She is a member of the Communications team.

Samantha Nutt: Global Health Icon

In high school, I first heard about Dr. Samantha Nutt when she came to speak to my school about global health in war torn regions, the talk she gave was one of the most inspiring and eloquent speeches I have ever heard and since then I have been inspired by her career and her work around the world. I thought I would share a bit of what she has done to the GlobeMed community!

Dr. Nutt is the founder and president of War Child Canada, a charity that works in regions that have been torn apart by conflict. She focuses on helping women and children in these regions, providing health care, education and vocational training in order to get their lives back on track. She has worked in regions such as Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, Uganda, and The Democratic Republic of the Congo to name a few. In addition to her work with War Child she is a physician at the Women’s College Hospital in Toronto and is a Professor at the University of Toronto. In 2011, she was appointed the Order of Canada – the most prestigious honor bestowed by the Canadian Federal government for “for her contributions to improving the plight of young people in the world’s worst conflict zones, notably as a founder of War Child Canada.” How she ever has time to sleep, I am not sure!

Her recent book “Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies and Aid”- a national bestseller – is a comprehensive look back on her career and her experience in the foreign aid industry. An excellent read that I highly recommend everyone check out as it mixes her personal narrative and experiences with facts about foreign aid, and its failures and successes.

She is someone who has inspired me and taught me a lot about foreign aid, and the challenges of effective distribution of health throughout war-torn regions. I find that her methods and philosophies about global health are very similar to GlobeMed’s! Everyone should check out her book, or even go on youtube and check out a couple speeches she has made to learn a bit more about her and War Child Canada!

Here are some I have found really interesting:

Future of Aid – Dr. Samantha Nutt Keynote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALCScV_CoA0 (starting at 5 minutes)

CBC News Our World: Africa’s Killing Field

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCbdfMWZL54

Adrienne Caldwell is a sophomore majoring in Biology and Psychology.  She is a member of the Communications team.